Eleman Pars Abnoos

Oregano and gastrointestinal inflammation

Oregano and gastrointestinal inflammation

American researchers found that a chemical in Organo, called carvacrol, eliminated neuroviruses in the mouse body. According to the Publications of the Medicines Research Institute, an American scholar found that a chemical in Oregano, called carvacrol, destroys neuroviruses in the body of the mouse, according to a report from the Iranian Student News Agency (ISNA). NeuroVirus is responsible for 267 million cases of acute gastroenteritis around the world, and this pathogen is transmitted from person to person through respiration, water and food, according to the Iranian Student News Agency (ISNA). Neuro viruses have been detected four decades ago, but no specific treatment has been made to counteract them. The virus has contaminated solids and resists many disinfectants. Researchers from the University of Arizona, led by Dr. Kelly Bright, have found that Oregano has a chemical called carvacrol, which can lead to the elimination of neuro viruses. This chemical is able to break the layer of proteins surrounding the virus and the other antimicrobial agents, also penetrates into the virus, and eliminates it. Carvacrol does not produce any harmful by-products or gases, and according to its distinctive aroma, it can be used as disinfectant in schools and hospitals. More researches should be done to achieve the potential for carvacrol disinfectants. But in the future this chemical can be used as a disinfectant for food and even for antibiotics, which is a unique method for virus attack. Oregano is a very good spice flavor. Recent studies by Long Island University researchers in 2012 suggest that this detoxifier can be used to treat prostate cancer, and the carvacrol chemical prevents cell suicide. "Some researches suggest that eating pizza reduces the risk of cancer and this property is related to the lycopene found in tomato sauce, but new researches show the essential role of Oregano spice," said Dr. Supraya Baudakdak, associate professor at Long Island University. In this regard, the results of this study are published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology.

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